Hong Kong / Maps of Occupied Districts

Hong Kong / Maps of Occupied Districts
The Admiralty Map (金鐘上河圖)
Mong Kok: Argyle Street and Nathan Road © 2014, K.K. Rebecca Lai and Sergio Peçanha
Mong Kok: Argyle Street and Nathan Road © 2014, K.K. Rebecca Lai and Sergio Peçanha
Admiralty: Government Offices © 2014, K.K. Rebecca Lai and Sergio Peçanha
Admiralty: Government Offices © 2014, K.K. Rebecca Lai and Sergio Peçanha
Causeway Bay: SOGO and Hysan Place © 2014, K.K. Rebecca Lai and Sergio Peçanha
Causeway Bay: SOGO and Hysan Place © 2014, K.K. Rebecca Lai and Sergio Peçanha

 

The top 3 images illustrated the occupied areas in Umbrella Movement on 20th October 2014 in Mong Kok, Admiralty and Causeway Bay respectively. These regions have been cleared and returned normal one by one from early to mid-December.

At first, protesters led by student organisations, HKFS(Hong Kong Federation of Students) and Scholarism, and the committee of Occupy Central Campaign, led by Professor Benny Tai Yiu-ting, only occupied parts of Connaught Road Central, Harcourt Road and Tim Mei Avenue in Admiralty near the Central Government Offices and Legislative Council Complex.

A bit different from past protests in Hong Kong, protesters used to gather at Victoria Park and then start their parades towards Admiralty; for Umbrella Movement, it was started in Admiralty directly because of a previous event (Students’ Strike) at Tamar Park.

Tremendous amount of protesters and citizens gathered for the revolution in admiralty by public transportation so quickly that the police could not stop them from occupying the street. (To be exact, original pedestrian streets are out of capacity of holding that amount of people.) This mode of occupying the roads were duplicated in Mong Kok and Causeway Bay which soon became the other two main occupied areas for the movement.

 

The Admiralty Map (金鐘上河圖)
The Admiralty Map (金鐘上河圖)

 

Later, in early October, when the Government and police stopped exerting repressive tactics on the peaceful protesters, the protesters started to develop and practice a self-organized urban transformation in the occupied areas. For example, people developed temporary dwellings (mostly tents) and public services like study rooms, first-aid, supply and charging stations. The above map was found during my site visit to Harcourt Road near Admiralty MTR exit A (Admiralty Centre).

 

 

Reference:

K.K. Rebecca Lai and Sergio Peçanha, The New York Times. (2014) Areas of Skirmishes and Protests in Hong Kong. [Online] Available from: http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/09/30/world/asia/2014-09-30-hong-kong-protest-locations.html?smid=fb-share&_r=0. [Accessed: 16th December 2014].

3 Comments on “Hong Kong / Maps of Occupied Districts

  1. There are mainly two causes for occupying the public transportation space in Admiralty and other downtown places. One is the tremendous amount of protesters are far more beyond the capacity of the open public space, such as Tamar Park, and the other is by blocking the main roads in busy district, the presences and impacts of the protest activities would be expanded to larger scale. No matter it was purposely organized or compelled without alternative choice, the protest activities did benefit from blocking the transportation space.

  2. The protesters chose spaces which were iconic to Hong Kong such as Tamar and bustling commercial hubs, but the lack of actual urban public space in Hong Kong and its focus on infrastructural links make it seem, however, that the blocking of transportation routes was an inadvertent result. For people in the city, the majority of public spaces are transient – areas they commute through, not places they stop in – which makes a protest also a roadblock.

  3. The occupation of Admiralty or the “start” or the occupation can actually be illustrated in a more detail way of how people moved from the Civic Square to Lung Wo Road, and expanded to Tim Wa Road, this expansion might have illustrated the hidden problem of the Government’s planning in roads, and the importance of pedestrian during the Government planning.

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