Managing Heritage in an Urban Century

Managing Heritage in an Urban Century
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The Historic Urban Landscape: Managing Heritage in an Urban Century © Amazon.com

 

I find this book by Francesco Bandarin and Ron Van Oers particularly interesting and relevant to the discussion of Kyoto’s struggle in balancing preservation and urban growth. The title is “The Historic Urban Landscape: Managing Heritage in an Urban Century”. It writes about the difficulties of making consensus while dealing with urban heritage as the more developed a city is, the more complex it is for conservation or preservation to exist. (Not mention that world’s population is increasing rapidly and accommodation has already been a problem.) Unless there is a set of urban policies that addresses heritage’s importance, these heritage would be destroyed in the 21st century. Therefore, it requires new and innovative ways to preserve heritages.

The book analyses how World Heritage sites are managed, and discuss the development of local urban conservation policies. It refers to Kyoto’s landscape policy in 2007 as an example, and brings out the fundamental reason for Kyoto’s success in managing heritage in an urban century: “conservation plan and management plan, however, must read as one entity, as neither part has any real value unless both are completed in an integrated manner. The management plan is concerned with determining what is required on the site by focusing on significance, thinking about how the place should and can develop, and determining the key management issues related to this and how they will be addressed. That is, there is a need to move from a vision to general policies to specific guidelines and actions.” The book also stresses the importance of having local strategic partnerships to cooperate in decision-making process whenever conflict happens.

 

Reference: Bandarin, Francesco, and Ron Van Oers. The Historic Urban Landscape: Managing Heritage in an Urban Century. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Wiley Blackwell, 2012. Print.

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