The Middle Age Kyoto (Transformation of Kyoto 2)

The New City Plan of Kyoto after Heian (Japanese Historical Maps, East Asian Library - University of California)
The New City Plan of Kyoto after Heian
(Japanese Historical Maps, East Asian Library – University of California)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Map and Drawings published in Meji Period (Japanese Historical Maps, East Asian Library - University of California)
Map and Drawings published in Meji Period
(Japanese Historical Maps, East Asian Library – University of California)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The pure grid in the Heian plan and Imperial Palace in the upper middle as a centre totally disappeared in the Medieval Kyoto city plan. All the districts, avenues, markets and houses were being gradually redesigned based on the need of the society in that period, no longer having those former symbolic control. Because of wars and some natural disasters, the evolution of city and building forms increased by reconstruction after destruction. Encouraging by the citizens from different classes and backgrounds, organic growth of the city was being proposed and used. The new urban quarters with little roads were lined by artisans and traders, and those lanes had become where people could see urban interactions happen. Due to the change of social composition at that time, caused the improvements in agriculture and increase of farm lands. Also, there were more and more merchants and artisans in city and this required large social spaces for them to sell things or exchange. Therefore, many stalls were set up by traders on both sides along the full length of city road and it contributed to the appearance of the medieval Kyoto. Furthermore, this kind of shop-house was actually the prototype of the popular Japanese town-houses typology (machiya) that we know nowadays.

THE TRACE OF BUILDING/CITY POLICY OF KYOTO IN THE PAST 40 YEARS AND THE IMPACTS

 

Fieve, N., & Waley, P. (2003). Japanese Capitals in Historical Perspective: Place, Power and Memory in Kyoto, Edo and Tokyo. RoutledgeCurzon.

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