Kyoto City Landscape Policy 2007/ Kyoto Landscape Award for Architecture

京都景観賞 屋外広告物部門 – Kyoto Landscape Award for Architecture

[Local Government]

The ‘Kyoto Landscape Award for Architecture’ is a campaign by the City of Kyoto to recognize and reward the efforts to create an harmonious landscape. The building must have a creative design that takes in consideration the local history, culture, surrounding landscape and community. Buildings that are brand new or renovated since 2003 are all eligible for application.

京都八百一本館 Kyoto 801 Main Building received the ‘mayors prize’ in 2014. Located in Nakagyo-ku, the building has shops, restaurants and a rooftop farm [1]. The rooftop also functions as public space and becomes an area where the consumer and producer interact, hence promoting the idea of agriculture in the city. The facade is also quite consistent with the neighbouring buildings and the use of the small tiles and local wood is particularly effective.

Facade of Kyoto 801 Main Building. Source: Shinken Chiku

The building heights and design regulations may be a limitation to the design of architecture in Kyoto, but I would argue any architecture must address the site anyway. Furthermore, the design regulations mainly dictate the facade design but the interior spaces are completely up to the architect, allowing for different unique spatial designs.

 

[1] City of Kyoto. Kyoto Landscape Award for Architecture. 2014. http://www.city.kyoto.lg.jp/tokei/cmsfiles/contents/0000179/179976/keikansho26-pamphlet.pdf. Accessed 27th December 2018.

1 Comment on “Kyoto City Landscape Policy 2007/ Kyoto Landscape Award for Architecture

  1. How you would comment on the act of conforming to the site constraints for example facade consistency, yet using them not in the logic it was before, but just a kind of mimicking or for visual reason? Is that still a good way of addressing the site? I think one of the difficult architects practising in these historical sites in Japan or China is this struggle between the physical as a result of an ancient design logic and the modern way of living and aesthetics. What do you think about that?

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