The Sharon and the Drobles Plan

The 1967 plans which followed closely to that of the Allon plan paved and altered the way to further plans in the later years to further boost Israel’s political and security boundary. However, as the political scene of Israel begin changing, so did the political views of subsequent planners for Jerusalem and the areas surrounding Jerusalem. One change did emerge following the years of the Allon plan was the change in the ruling party of Israel. After a series of political discourse.  Firstly, there was a change in the ruling party and secondly, the emergence of Gush Emunim. (Tessler 1994)

  1. The Israel labour party vs Likud Party

The Likud party was founded in 1973 and emphasizes national security policy based on a strong military force when threatened with continued enmity against Israel. It has shown reluctance to negotiate with its neighbours whom it believes continue to seek the destruction of the Jewish state. Its suspicion of Arab intentions has been one of the driving principles of decisions made by the government.

While on the other hand, the Israeli labour party governing Israel since 1948 is a social democratic and Zionist political party in Israel. The Israeli Labour Party was established in 1968. he Labour Party is associated with supporting the Israeli–Palestinian peace process, pragmatic foreign affairs policies and social democratic economic policies. The party is a member of the Progressive Alliance and an observer member of the Party of European Socialists. (Wikipedia 2018)

The Likud came to power having adopted a pro-settlement platform highly critical of the Allon Plan limitations and having pledged their support for the initiation of unfettered settlement programs throughout the occupied Palestinian territories.

  1. Gush Emunim

Gush Emunim was an Israeli Orthodox Jewish, messianic, right-wing activist movement committed to establishing Jewish settlements in the West Bank, the Gaza Strip, and the Golan Heights. Gush Emunim sprang out of the conquests of the Six-Day War in 1967, encouraging Jewish settlement of the land based on the belief that, according to the Torah, God gave it to the Jewish people.

The Drobles Plan, 1977

The settlement project intensified under the Likud Party in 1977, which “declared that the entire historic Land of Israel is the inalienable heritage of the Jewish people, and that no part of the West Bank should be handed over to foreign rule.193 The government repealed the prohibition from purchasing occupied land by Israelis and implemented the Drobles Plan. The Drobles Plan embraced the aims of Gush Emunim and signalled a governmental shift away from the Allon Plan. This shift correlated to the Likud Party coming to power in Israel. (Denise DeGarmo n.d.)

Following the Drobles plan,

The former Israeli Minister of Agriculture Ariel Sharon modified and expanded the Drobles Plan and Gush Emunim, by intensifying colonization along the Green Line to secure the borders between the West Bank and Israel.

The Sharon Plan in 1968 also called for increasing the colonization along the central mountain ridge. According to the Sharon Plan, only a small number of high density Palestinian communities were not to be under Israeli sovereignty in the future.

The Allon Plan dealt with the ‘demographic problem’ posed to Israel by the Palestinian population through avoidance, whereas, the Sharon Plan continued the more aggressive policies that relied on removal and transfer of the Palestinian population out of the occupied Palestinian territories.  The aim of the Sharon Plan was the annexation of the West Bank, excluding small densely populated Palestinian enclaves. (Lein 2002)

References

Denise DeGarmo, Ph.D. n.d. “The Israeli Settlement Enterprise: Grave Breaches of International Law.”

Lein, Yehezkel. 2002. Land Grab, Israel’s Settlement Policy. B’TSELEM.

Tessler, Mark A. 1994. A History of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict. Indiana.

Wikipedia. 2018. “Likud.” Likud. Wikipedia.

 

 

 

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