Tashkent earthquake/Urban Public Transport in Post-Communist Transition: The Case of Tashkent, Uzbekista

This article is written by Dr Alexandr Akimov, a senior lecturer in the Business school of Griffith University and David Banister, a Professor of Transport Studies in Havard University and director of the Transport Studies Unit.  The essay studied the post-communist transition of the public transportation of Tashkent, with the first section discussing the emergence of well-organized public transport and development before the independence in 1991, then evaluate the negative effects of the earlier reforms during the post-independence era.

There is one part focusing on the analysis of the Tashkent underground system. The decision of constructing underground network is carried by the Soviet government due to the rapid expansion of the city. Until 1991, public transport in Tashkent is well developed, with two lines of the underground with 23 stations, with the length of 31km. The latter part has discussed the aftereffect of the underground network built in Tashkent, exemplified by its expensive construction cost and the decreasing number of passengers.

Excerpt of theUrban Public Transport in Post-Communist Transition: The Case of Tashkent, Uzbekistan
Source : Akimov, Alexandr, and David Banister. “Urban Public Transport in Post-Communist Transition: The Case of Tashkent, Uzbekistan.” Comparative Economic Studies 53, no. 4 (2011): 721-55.

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