Sustainable Leisure and Tourism Space Development in Post-Industrial Cities: the Case of Odaiba, Tokyo, Japan

Murayama and Parker critiques consumption and leisure becoming more important in the lives of the Japanese, transforming post-industrial cities to revolve around consumerism and explains how mixed land use and amenity environments are vital to maintain balance in the community. Factors that makes consumerism or tourism driven planning includes “living within walking distance from work, with easy access to cultural industries and other services [that] can provide a better quality of life…”.

The ideal mixed land use environment is conceptualised, composed of three main elements: work, live and play which are essential to create a sustainable living environment. It enables comparison between different spatial qualities and acts as the template to assess how spaces are utilized such as amenity environment.

The rapid urban development since the 1980s posed a heavy financial burden onto the TMG, resulting in a rise in demand for office and consumer spaces over residential. The initial idea was to construct a Teleport Centre as a result of mixed-use lands and amenity environments as mentioned previously, to create multimedia industries as well as higher level education facilities and shopping centres not only to create employment, but at the same time repopulate people away from central Tokyo to alleviate congestion.

Reference:

Meiko Murayama and Gavin Parker, “Sustainable Leisure and Tourism Space Development in Post-Industrial Cities: the Case of Odaiba, Tokyo, Japan”, Tourism, Culture and Regeneration, (CABI, 2006), 69–84

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